Ba Bheg Beach

Many people don’t know that Hook Head has two harbours. Slade habour is the easily recognisable one as it’s still in use and has a man-made structure. The other one is Ba Bheag, located on the estuary side of the peninsula it was used for many years by families from Churchtown because of it’s sheltered…

Lugworms

The humble lugworm, used as bait for generations, is a common sight on sand and mud. Or rather their distinctive casings are since the lugworm itself seldom leaves it’s burrow. The burrow is a U-shaped tunnel that begins at a shallow depression, this is the head end of the lugworm from which the worm ingests…

A close up of a daisy like flower with a beach in the background.

Sea Chamomile

A common sight on shingle and scrub land near the coast is the Sea Chamomile or Sea Mayweed  (Tripleurospermum maritimum). The daisy like flowers of this native can be seen from July to September. When the leaves are crushed they yield a faint, sweet smell similar to their relative Chamomile (or the tea variety). This…

Dollar Bay

Ever wonder how Dollar Bay got it’s name? Are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin. In the summer of 1765 the ship the ‘Earl of Sandwich’ set sail on a trip from London to Santa Cruz to the Canary Islands before returning home. It was at this last stop that they took on board cargo…

Bright yellow bird perched in amongst some branches.

Yellowhammer

The yellowhammer is much less often seen these days as changes in agricultural practices have lead to it’s decline. The species is currently on the red conservation status in Ireland. This brightly coloured member of the bunting family can be found around arable fields especially this time of year in freshly harvested cereal fields as…

Slade Beach

Situated next to the harbour in the village of Slade on the opposite side of the peninsula to the famous Hook Lighthouse, this is a lovely sheltered beach from which to watch the comings and goings from the harbour. Recently a safe swimming zone has been created with the installation of two, yellow buoys. Slade…

A Kestrel hovering against a blue sky

Kestrel

A Kestrel hangs poised and focused over the cliffs at Carnivan, waiting to pounce on its unsuspecting and unfortunate prey. A common sight around the coasts this bird of prey can usually be seen hovering in the sky looking for it’s lunch. It mainly eats small mammals but can also be seen eating insects, invertebrates…

Old RNLI Boathouse

This lifeboat house was built in 1886 at a cost of £603 and remained in service until the disaster of the Helen Blake lifeboat in 1914. The Helen Blake Lifeboat disaster occurred on 20 February 1914. That afternoon the Norwegian schooner Mexico ran aground on the Keeragh Islands. The Fethard Lifeboat launched to rescue the…

A natural formation of a pattern in sand at a beach

Sand art at Dollar Bay

We pride ourselves here in Ireland (and especially Wexford!) on our sandy beaches, but what is sand and why is sand so varied in both grain colour and size? Next time you go to the beach grab a handful and examine. What colour? It’s going to be composed mainly of the our most abundant minerals…

A yellow butterfly on a yellow flower

Clouded Yellow Butterfly

Over the last couple of months the Clouded Yellow butterfly put on a good display around parts of the Hook Peninsula, especially Booley Bay. A visitor from Northern Africa, it visits mainly the South and East of Ireland. Its beautiful deep yellow colour is best seen when in flight, as it always rests with folded…