A periwinkle in the foreground with a trail stretching into the background.

Periwinkle goes for a walk

Wait for me! A common Periwinkle makes its way down to the tide on Dollar Bay and leaves quite an impressive trail as it does so. They don’t normally wander too far from their habitats but in order to lay their eggs, they must make this long, arduous trek (in snail-pace terms anyway!)

A collection of off white coloured foam on a sandy beach with waves in the background

Sea Foam

Sea Foam or Spume is as its name suggests just that. Foam is the result of gas, in this case air, mixing with liquid-seawater. This happens especially in the surf-zone when large waves are active. Dissolved organic particles in the seawater act as foaming agents or surfactants, similar to what you get in washing-up liquid.…

Conigear

Anyone who has ever taken a walk out behind the lighthouse has probably seen this large bay situated to the east of the lighthouse. The name is either an anglicisation from the Irish coinic√©ar meaning warren or related to the Middle-English word for rabbits, coney. Back in the day country estates were never complete without…

Ba Bheg Beach

Many people don’t know that Hook Head has two harbours. Slade habour is the easily recognisable one as it’s still in use and has a man-made structure. The other one is Ba Bheag, located on the estuary side of the peninsula it was used for many years by families from Churchtown because of it’s sheltered…

Lugworms

The humble lugworm, used as bait for generations, is a common sight on sand and mud. Or rather their distinctive casings are since the lugworm itself seldom leaves it’s burrow. The burrow is a U-shaped tunnel that begins at a shallow depression, this is the head end of the lugworm from which the worm ingests…

Dollar Bay

Ever wonder how Dollar Bay got it’s name? Are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin. In the summer of 1765 the ship the ‘Earl of Sandwich’ set sail on a trip from London to Santa Cruz to the Canary Islands before returning home. It was at this last stop that they took on board cargo…

Slade Beach

Situated next to the harbour in the village of Slade on the opposite side of the peninsula to the famous Hook Lighthouse, this is a lovely sheltered beach from which to watch the comings and goings from the harbour. Recently a safe swimming zone has been created with the installation of two, yellow buoys. Slade…