Explore posts on all aspects of life on the hook peninsula. They highlight the diversity of the peninsula, be that in history, flora, fauna or the ground beneath your feet.

Ba Bheg Beach

Many people don’t know that Hook Head has two harbours. Slade habour is the easily recognisable one as it’s still in use and has a man-made structure. The other one is Ba Bheag, located on the estuary side of the peninsula it was used for many years by families from Churchtown because of it’s sheltered…

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Lugworms

The humble lugworm, used as bait for generations, is a common sight on sand and mud. Or rather their distinctive casings are since the lugworm itself seldom leaves it’s burrow. The burrow is a U-shaped tunnel that begins at a shallow depression, this is the head end of the lugworm from which the worm ingests…

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Dollar Bay

Ever wonder how Dollar Bay got it’s name? Are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin. In the summer of 1765 the ship the ‘Earl of Sandwich’ set sail on a trip from London to Santa Cruz to the Canary Islands before returning home. It was at this last stop that they took on board cargo…

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Slade Beach

Situated next to the harbour in the village of Slade on the opposite side of the peninsula to the famous Hook Lighthouse, this is a lovely sheltered beach from which to watch the comings and goings from the harbour. Recently a safe swimming zone has been created with the installation of two, yellow buoys. Slade…

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Sand art at Dollar Bay

We pride ourselves here in Ireland (and especially Wexford!) on our sandy beaches, but what is sand and why is sand so varied in both grain colour and size? Next time you go to the beach grab a handful and examine. What colour? It’s going to be composed mainly of the our most abundant minerals…

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Booley Bay after storm Darwin

Here’s a classic example of before and after. The clean picture was taken last week but check out the other picture to see how Booley Bay looked back in March. No its not taken from the set of Terminator, this is how the storms combined with high tides left poor Booley not too long ago.…

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