Explore posts on all aspects of life on the hook peninsula. They highlight the diversity of the peninsula, be that in history, flora, fauna or the ground beneath your feet.

Limekilns

For the majority of the last two centuries lime was a very important farming and building resource. These strange buildings are part of that story.

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Black-Headed Gull

The Black-Headed Gull is commonly spotted around the Hook peninsula and indeed all Irish coasts. Familiar as it may be, this small gull is now a Red-Listed species. Numbers are dropping and breeding colonies are more localised, with Wexford and Donegal having the largest coastal colonies. Its name is misleading as it doesn’t really have…

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St Dubhan’s Church

The medieval church built on the site of St Dubhán’s monastery who gave his name to the Irish for the peninsula, Rinn Dubhán. They were also the first keepers of a warning beacon on the peninsula.

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Shore Crab

A native to these shores (Carcinus maenas) is commonly found on beaches and in rock pools. They aren’t picky eaters and will feast on anything and everything that they come across including seaweed, molluscs and smaller crabs. It is normally a green colour but can sometimes be orange or red. Although a native to Europe…

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Ba Bheg Beach

Many people don’t know that Hook Head has two harbours. Slade habour is the easily recognisable one as it’s still in use and has a man-made structure. The other one is Ba Bheag, located on the estuary side of the peninsula it was used for many years by families from Churchtown because of it’s sheltered…

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Lugworms

The humble lugworm, used as bait for generations, is a common sight on sand and mud. Or rather their distinctive casings are since the lugworm itself seldom leaves it’s burrow. The burrow is a U-shaped tunnel that begins at a shallow depression, this is the head end of the lugworm from which the worm ingests…

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Sea Chamomile

A common sight on shingle and scrub land near the coast is the Sea Chamomile or Sea Mayweed  (Tripleurospermum maritimum). The daisy like flowers of this native can be seen from July to September. When the leaves are crushed they yield a faint, sweet smell similar to their relative Chamomile (or the tea variety). This…

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